© 2017-2020 Tiny Investigations with Gina Lovoi.

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It just keeps getting more exciting!  Because I've been getting allot of questions lately on how this all works, I'd like to talk a little bit about the process of having a Tiny Investigation done.  First, the "tasker" (or the person who wants a Tiny Investigation conducted) will come up with a question (a.k.a. a "task" or an "objective").  The question is then written down, along with "coordinates" (or eight numbers broken up into two sets of four numbers).  The coordinates suggest a location, but here's where it gets really trippy.  The location/the coordinate is the question.  The eight numbers represent the idea of the question.  From there, ONLY the eight numbers will be sent to me (the "viewer" or "remote viewer").  It is important that you do not send in your actual question until the very end, just the numbers to start.  I will then take the numbers and conduct a remote viewing session.  The data pulled from the session will be written down in a certain way (a "protocol").  After collecting the data, I will then send the tasker the entire remote viewing session with a brief explanation of each page.  Additionally, and this is where I get rebellious, I will write up a blog post (just like this one) which makes a flat out guess or deduction of what your question was, based on the remote viewing session.  Typically, remote viewers keep all of the information at low-level attributes (adjectives mostly), but they do not name things specifically.  For the fun of the blog, not only am I naming things specifically, but I'm also investigating further based on my assumptions.  At the end, the tasker gets two very different things:  1 - a remote viewing session sent via email (which almost always contains some pertinent and genuine information relating to the original question) and 2 - a blog post to make you chuckle (like a modern-day Zoltar with a sense of humor).  For the final step, the tasker (you) tells the viewer (me) the original question and it is included at the very end of the blog post.  If you're thinking of doing this with me, please take a look at the full website (www.tinyinvestigations.com) and get in touch with me (ginalovoi@gmail.com). 

 

Today's blog is about my second Tiny Investigation done for my supportive and patient partner in life, Julie.  The accompanying photo is of a really cute porcupine.  This investigation was a little different because I went into it partially informed.  Julie had asked me "Who or what is this?"  In addition to giving me her eight numbers, I knew I was searching for a who or a what.  Based on the remote viewing session, I believe Julie was having me view a porcupine or one of those weeds that looks like a pom pom (officially called a Taraxacum or Dandelion Flower).  Here's where I get a little confused.  Uh, Julie, everyone knows what a porcupine and a dandelion flower looks like...or even a porcupine making a wish by blowing out all the little allergy inducing fuzzy parts of said flower.  Seriously, we see this kind of thing every day.  So, I'm left wondering why Julie would ask about this.  Is she ill-informed (or uninformed) on animals and horticulture?  Perhaps.  However, I've known Julie for over a decade now and I feel mostly comfortable saying this was not the issue.  So back to the drawing board.  Here's my final conclusion of what Julie was having me investigate:  Julie's question of "Who or what is this?" is based on a photograph of a prickly or petaled or feathered subject (like a bird or a porcupine) which had been taken from the sky and placed on the ground.  Her confusion on knowing what the subject was exactly is based on Julie's lack of wearing prescription glasses when she really should have on bifocals every waking moment.  If I might just take a moment, as your partner, to plead a case for wearing glasses with a current prescription.  Holding a menu across a restaurant one or two times so you can see the words is cute, but after ten years, c'mon!  So many lessons learned here today!  Thank you Julie for entrusting me with your question and trusting me to put forth an answer, even when you know I'm bound to get in some nagging one way or the other.

 

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